Brougham carriage

Prints (0)

Description

Summary A brougham pronounced "broom" or "brohm" was a light, four-wheeled horse-drawn carriage built in the 19th century. It was named after Scottish jurist Lord Brougham, who had this type of carriage built to his specification by London coachbuilder Robinson & Cook in 1838 or 1839. It had an enclosed body with two doors, like the rear section of a coach; it sat two, sometimes with an extra pair of fold-away seats in the front corners, and with a box seat in front for the driver and a footman or passenger. Unlike a coach, the carriage had a glazed front window, so that the occupants could see forward. The forewheels were capable of turning sharply. A variant, called a brougham-landaulet, had a top collapsible from the rear doors backward. In 19th-century London, broughams previously owned and used as private carriages were commonly sold off for use as hackney carriages, often displaying painted-over traces of the previous owner's coat of arms on the carriage doors. The special characteristics of the brougham bear a distinct similarity to the London Public Carriage Office's "Conditions of Fitness" for a vehicle intending to be licenced as a taxi cab. Foto by Sixergy First variant https://myminifactory.com/obje... https://myminifactory.com/obje...

Instructions 

Printed at 0.2mm resolution with 10% Infill

Design Files

File Size

B2.1.stl
107 KB
B2.5.stl
189 KB
B2.15.stl
115 KB
B2.6.stl
134 KB
B2.7.stl
540 KB
B2.14.stl
151 KB
B2.12.stl
134 KB
B2.16.stl
115 KB
B3.4.stl
44.8 KB
B2.9.stl
98.3 KB
B2.11.stl
134 KB
B2.10.stl
34.3 KB
B2.8.stl
618 KB
B2.13.stl
98.3 KB
B3.2.stl
359 KB
B3.3.stl
359 KB

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